WHO alarmed by resurgence of coronavirus cases in Europe

Hospital staff gather and react in front of the hospital to pay tribute after a caring staff member who died from COVID-19 on 21 June, while she worked in the COVID-19 unit at the Etterbeek-Ixelles site of the Iris Sud Hospitals in Brussels, Belgium. EPA-EFE/STEPHANIE LECOCQ

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Europe has seen an increase in weekly cases of Covid-19 for the first time in months as restrictions are eased, the World Health Organization (WHO) says.

In 11 places, accelerated transmission has led to “very significant resurgence”, said Regional Director Dr Hans Henri Kluge.

His warnings about the risk of resurgence had become reality, he said.

If left unchecked, he warned health systems would be “pushed to the brink”.

More than 2.6 million cases of Covid-19 and 195,000 deaths have been reported in the WHO’s European region, which is expansive, covering 54 countries and seven territories across Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia.

Almost 20,000 new cases and more than 700 new deaths are being recorded daily.

“For weeks, I have spoken about the risk of resurgence as countries adjust measures,” Dr Kluge told a virtual news conference on Thursday.

“In several countries across Europe, this risk has now become a reality – 30 countries have seen increases in new cumulative cases over the past two weeks.

“In 11 of these countries, accelerated transmission has led to very significant resurgence that if left unchecked will push health systems to the brink once again.”

The 11 countries and territories were later identified by the WHO as Armenia, Sweden, Moldova, North Macedonia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine and Kosovo.

Despite warning about resurgences, he said the WHO anticipated that the situation would calm down further in the majority of countries over the summer.

“But we have indeed to prepare for the fall, when Covid-19 may meet seasonal influenza, pneumonia, other diseases as well, because ultimately the virus is still actively circulating in our communities and there is no effective treatment, no effective vaccine, yet.”

Read more via BBC

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