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tanjatatomirovicNowadays, for most people everyday life comprises a comprehensive use of modern technologies, communications in the digital world as well as sharing information and content in real time via a large number of social networks. Mobile – Smart phones are with us almost all the time but their initial, primary function – telephone conversation – is increasingly giving way to other forms of online communication.

The use of modern technology in all aspects of life also inevitably affects the way we view and experience the world and people around us and the way we see ourselves in the environment. Photos of others, and more and more of ourselves, as well as portraits and self-portraits that we make with an unprecedented ease – are provided to us by tools that are no longer the privilege of a small number of people, but the mass means of communication.

The connection between the latest technological solutions and social networks has offered a platform in which a self-portrait gets its own mass version in the form of selfies and its visibility and distribution has been supported by sharing information in real time.

SelfieMost young people have less need for privacy than the people of the older generations, and therefore they make more selfies and are more active on social networks. Their selfies can be a reflection of vanity, but not always – but we must consider the fact that selfies are also made by politicians in order to convey an attitude, celebrities to get closer to the fans, ordinary people who want to make someone laugh (International Journal of Communications No. 9, Baym and Senft, 2015).

Addressing the possible link between taking selfies and low self-esteem, dependency and narcissism, the authors claim that “… we have not seen a single reviewed work of scientific literature that demonstrates convincingly that the creation of selfies and mental illness are correlated.”

In other words, selfies in most cases cannot be linked to the development of mental illnesses and the desire to impose on others, but it can be linked to the need to people connect and communicate with other and convey a message to them.

Read more in this article by Tanja Tatomirovic which confirms that selfie, as a form of communication via self- portrait, is not basically a novelty but it is the phenomenon which is the result of the technological development, as well as to try to explain the purpose of self-portrayal i.e. selfie phenomenon.

The article appeared first on Thrive Global.

Tanja is the author of the book about WW2 fascist radio propaganda. PR, MSc, PhD researcher. A character from one novel. Works for Microsoft and writes for Thrive Global and www.Lavche73.net. She also collaborates with Diplomatique|Expert on a number of areas of expertise.

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