Pre-Hispanic ruins discovered in a remote Mexican hill

One of the pre-Hispanic ruins that was found in Cerro de la Pena, in the Huehuepiaxtla community of the municipality of Axutla, in the state of Puebla, Mexico. EPA-EFE/Hilda Rios

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Pre-Hispanic vestiges dating from the classical period of the Zapoteca culture were recently discovered on Cerro de la Pena, in the Huehuepiaxtla community of the municipality of Axutla, in the state of Puebla, Mexico.

They were found by residents of the nearby village of Santa Cruz Huehuepiaxtla, in the central Mexican state of Puebla, after being hidden for centuries in Cerro de la Pena.

Pre-Hispanic vestiges discovered in a remote Mexican hill
 Pre-Hispanic vestiges dating from the classical period of the Zapoteca culture on Cerro de la Pena, in the Huehuepiaxtla community of the municipality of Axutla, in the state of Puebla, Mexico. EPA-EFE/Hilda Rios

Two pre-Hispanic carved stone monuments believed to date back more than 1,500 years have been uncovered on a mountaintop in central Mexico.

Archaeologists say the site in its heyday would have had seven pyramids, a ceremonial area, and a games court.

Pre-Hispanic vestiges discovered in a remote Mexican hill
Part of the discovery in Cerro de la Pena, in the Huehuepiaxtla community of the municipality of Axutla, in the state of Puebla, Mexico. EPA-EFE/Hilda Rios

One of the carvings is of a figure with horns and claws wearing a loincloth. Others are believed to represent an iguana, an eagle and female figure thought to be a deity resembling a bat.

 

Via EPA-EFE/Hilda Rios

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