New website gives a close look at the Shroud of Turin

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A new website aims to make available to all a collection of photographs of the Shroud of Turin by a scientific photographer who was part of a research project that spent more than one hundred hours conducting tests on the shroud.
The Shroud of Turin is a linen cloth 14 feet 5 inches long by 3 feet 7 inches wide, which shows the image of a man tortured and crucified. It is held by many Catholics to be the burial cloth that wrapped the body of Jesus after his death on the cross.
Vernon Miller was the official scientific photographer of the Shroud of Turin Research project. His photographs, and magnified micrographs of various aspects of the shroud, are now freely available to view or download at shroudphotos.com.
Photographs taken under ultraviolet light are also available for download. Organizers of the site say that it was Miller’s wish that his photograph’s be digitized and made available to those who have never seen them.

The site is the first place to publish a digitized and organized catalogue of Miller’s work.

The Holy Shroud displayed at the Cathedral of Turin
The Shroud is displayed at the Cathedral of Turin, in Turin, Italy.

From 1977 to 1981, a team of physicists, chemists, pathologists, and engineers from universities and U.S. government laboratories conducted the Shroud of Turin Research Project.

It had concluded that the shroud image is that of a real human form of a scourged, crucified man. It is not the product of an artist. The blood stains are composed of haemoglobin and also give a positive test for serum albumin.

But the image is an ongoing mystery and controversy and it remains unsolved.

The shroud has been in Turin, Italy since 1578, has been the subject of thousands of scientific investigations from diverse specialities, and more than 32,000 photographs have been taken of it. The Church’s official position on the shroud is one of neutrality.

Via CNA

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