Sat. Dec 14th, 2019

NASA scientists open untouched Moon rock and soil sample ahead of Artemis missions

epa07995044 An undated handout photo made available by NASA shows Apollo 17 astronaut Gene Cernan preparing to collect samples 73001 and 73002 from the Moon (issued 14 November 2019). NASA scientists opened an untouched rock and soil sample from the Moon returned to Earth on Apollo 17, marking the first time in more than 40 years a pristine sample of rock and regolith from the Apollo era has been opened. It sets the stage for scientists to practice techniques to study future samples collected on Artemis missions. The sample, opened 05 November 2019, in the Lunar Curation Laboratory at the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston, was collected on the Moon by Apollo 17 astronauts Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt, who drove a four-centimeter-wide tube into the surface of the Moon to collect it and another sample scheduled to be opened in January. The sample was opened as part of NASA's Apollo Next-Generation Sample Analysis (ANGSA) initiative, which is leveraging advanced technologies to study Apollo samples using new tools that were not available when the samples were originally returned to Earth. EPA-EFE/NASA HANDOUT HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES

Reading Time: 2 minutes

An undated handout photo made available by NASA shows Apollo 17 astronaut Gene Cernan preparing to collect samples 73001 and 73002 from the Moon (issued 14 November 2019).

NASA scientists opened an untouched rock and soil sample from the Moon returned to Earth on Apollo 17, marking the first time in more than 40 years a pristine sample of rock and regolith from the Apollo era has been opened.

It sets the stage for scientists to practice techniques to study future samples collected on Artemis missions.

NASA scientists open untouched Moon rock and soil sample ahead of Artemis missions
 An undated handout photo made available by NASA shows the scan of sample 73002 (below) taken using radiograph technology in 1974 by NASA, and the X-Ray Computed Microtomography scan (above) taken in 2019 at the University of Texas in Austin, Texas, USA (issued 14 November 2019). This is one example of the technological developments that are enabling a new generation to conduct new science on Apollo samples. EPA-EFE/NASA HANDOUT HANDOUT 

The sample, opened 05 November 2019, in the Lunar Curation Laboratory at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, was collected on the Moon by Apollo 17 astronauts Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt, who drove a four-centimeter-wide tube into the surface of the Moon to collect it and another sample scheduled to be opened in January.

NASA scientists open untouched Moon rock and soil sample ahead of Artemis missions
A handout photo made available by NASA shows Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Division (ARES) team members (L-R) Andria Mosie, Charis Krysh and Juliane Gross extruding an Apollo lunar core sample at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, USA, 05 November 2019 (issued 14 November 2019). A team of scientists on 05 November 2019, extracted the core from its tube and will soon send samples to other teams across the country to study. This sample was the first set of two scheduled to be opened in the coming months. Studying the rocks now will help a new generation of scientists better understand the Moon through the Artemis program. EPA-EFE/NASA/JAMES BLAIR HANDOUT 

The sample was opened as part of NASA’s Apollo Next-Generation Sample Analysis (ANGSA) initiative, which is leveraging advanced technologies to study Apollo samples using new tools that were not available when the samples were originally returned to Earth.

 

Via EPA-EFE/NASA HANDOUT

 

%d bloggers like this: