Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn clash over Brexit in BBC debate

epa08050354 A handout photo made available by the BBC shows Conservative party leader and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (C) and opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn (L) during a BBC TV debate in Maidstone, Kent, Britain, 06 December 2019. Britons will go to the polls on 12 December 2019 in a general election. EPA-EFE/JEFF OVERS / BBC / HANDOUT MANDATORY CREDIT NOTE TO EDITORS: Not for use more than 21 days after issue. HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES

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Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn clashed over Brexit in the final head-to-head debate before the 12 December election.

For two politicians who pride themselves on telling it straight, Johnson and Corbyn were both markedly on their best behaviour tonight.

They didn’t harangue each other, there was no heckling from the audience.

There was a wide range of subjects certainly, and profound disagreements – naturally.

But there was no moment that burst into fireworks. No massive gaffe on either side, or political car crash in the most public of forums.

BBC Leadership debate
 A handout photo made available by BBC shows BBC Studio before BBC Leadership debate between Conservative party leader and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (R) and opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn (L) during a BBC TV debate in Maidstone, Kent, Britain, 06 December 2019. Britons will go to the polls on 12 December 2019 in a general election. EPA-EFE/JEFF OVERS / BBC 

During the live debate, Mr Corbyn said Labour would bring Brexit “to an end” by negotiating a new deal and putting it back to the public in a referendum, alongside a Remain option.

Mr Johnson said he had “a wonderful deal”, and would use it to take the UK out of the EU on 31 January.

Other topics covered included the NHS, security and Northern Ireland.

Early on in the debate – hosted by Today presenter Nick Robinson – the Labour leader said he would negotiate a new withdrawal agreement with the EU within three months before putting it to a final say referendum – alongside Remain – within six months.

The prime minister countered by saying he already had a withdrawal agreement in place, and would use it to leave the EU next month if he won a working majority in Parliament.

But Nick Robinson challenged Mr Johnson, pointing out that while he had a withdrawal deal in place, he did not have a trade deal with the EU, and so could not rule out a no-deal exit in January 2021.

 

Via BBC

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