After ‘Decreto Dignita’ the Italian political debate centres on the anti-facist Mancino Law

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The Italian Parliament chamber gave the green light to the law Decreto Dignita which is the first law enacted and piloted by the new Italian government formation.

Italian news agency ANSA reports that Work and Industry Minister and Deputy Premier Luigi Di Maio said Friday that he was against Family Minister Lorenzo Fontana’s proposal to scrap the anti-fascist Mancino law. “As far as I’m concerned, the Mancino law should stay where it is,” Di Maio, the leader of the anti-establishment 5-Star Movement (M5S), said via Facebook. “The debate about the abolition of the Mancino Law can close as fast as it was opened.

“First of of all, it is not in the contract of government.

“Secondly, it is one of those arguments used for mass distraction that prevents us from concentrating on the real needs of the country – the fight against poverty, jobs and companies”. The proposal by Fontana, a member of the rightwing League, to abolish the law against apologising for fascism caused a furore.

Rome’s Jewish Community came out against it, saying the Mancino law is still necessary, while the opposition centre-left Democratic Party (PD) said the idea shows the far-right leanings of the League-M5S government.

Interior Minister Matteo Salvini they he agrees with Fontana’s assertion that the Mancino law should be scrapped, while stressing that this is not a priority for the government.

“If you ask me if we’ll prepare a bill or collect signatures to abolish the Mancino law, then I say No,” Salvini, who is also deputy premier and League leader, told ANSA. “It’s an idea, but it certainly is not a priority for the government and League, who are centred on jobs, taxes and security. “In the past the League proposed abolishing the Mancino law.

“I agree with Fontana’s proposal. You put other ideas against ideas, not handcuffs”.

ANSA.

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